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Vital Insights

Respiratory News and Views

Welcome to Vital Insights where we keep you up to date with all the latest respiratory news including clinical research, articles on respiratory topics, patient information pieces, and episodes of our ever popular Exhale podcast. We also give you a little insight into life at Vitalograph. 

Clinical Research Updates

The latest news on respiratory related clinical research.
cough-clinical-trial

Two global, phase 3 trials of chronic cough show a global population with burdensome cough of long duration and substantial impairment to quality of life

A pooled analysis by Dicpinigaitis PV et al. examined the medical histories and clinical characteristics of 2044 adult patients with refractory or unexplained chronic cough enrolled in the Phase 3 COUGH-1 and COUGH-2 trials.

Read more >

 
Air Pollution

Daily Associations of Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Risk

Exposure to air pollution is associated with acute pediatric asthma exacerbations, including reduced lung function, rescue medication usage, and increased symptoms, but most studies are limited in investigating longitudinal changes in these acute effects.

Read more >

 
Vitalograph Cough Studies. Photo by Vlada Karpovich

Significant reductions in cough frequency in study participants with chronic cough treated with gefapixant.

A recent pooled study by Smith JA et al. (2021) investigated cough frequency in chronic cough patients treated with gefapixant. The results significant reductions in 24-hour and awake cough frequency. 

Read more >

 
Vitalograph-asthma-studies

Disease persistence and lung function trajectories of childhood asthma.

Some asthmatic children outgrow their airway allergy in adulthood, but there is limited data predicting the persistence of childhood asthma in adults. Man Fung Tang, et al. (2022) aimed to characterise the trajectory of spirometric indices and identify predictors for the persistence of childhood asthma.

Read more >

 
Respiratory training and parkinsons disease

The effect of respiratory training on Parkinson’s Disease

A study by van de Wetering-van Dongen et al. (2020) evaluated whether respiratory training improves muscle strength, lung function, thoracic mobility, functional capacity, and cardiac autonomic function in PD.

Read more >

 
Vital Insights: DMD in Sweden

Long term treatment with ataluren – the Swedish experience

Michael et al. (2021) explored the long-term effects of ataluren on DMD patients’ upper motor and respiratory function over a median period of 6.3 years. The results were promising.

Read more >

 
Impact of lung function on cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors
Impact of lung function on cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors

A study by Au Yeung SL, et al. (2021) using data from the UK Biobank, aimed to clarify the role of lung function in cardiovascular disease and whether there is evidence of reverse causation.

Read more >

 
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Is Spirometry possible in 3- to 6-Year-Old Children with Cystic Fibrosis?

A recent study by Marostica P, et al. (2022) explored whether spirometry can be used on preschool children to assess lung function. The results are very positive.

Read more >

study medical
The role of pulmonary function in cardiometabolic endpoints

A recent study by Li G, et al. (2022) aimed to assess how pulmonary function has different risk magnitudes for cardiometabolic diseases (CD) and cardiometabolic multimorbidity (CM).

The study states that “pulmonary function could be used as a valuable predictor for the tailored prevention of individual cardiometabolic diseases and CM. Stratifying different high-risk populations through pulmonary function to implement precision medicine may have far-reaching clinical implications”.

The Vitalograph Pneumotrac was used in this study.

Read the full report. 

Vitalograph offers respiratory clinical trials solutions including ECG devices and expert cardiac analysis to ensure accurate endpoint data such as QT/QTc, as well as providing timely interpretations and alerts to support safety monitoring of subjects throughout your clinical trial.

| Vitalograph Clinical Trials |

 

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What is the impact of over-reading quality review on spirometry in clinical trials?

It has become best practice to review the quality of spirometry data, testing feedback, and overall quality of clinical trials spirometry data.

A study by Mottram et al. identified that an average of 12.2% of test sessions had a change to the original decision by the testing site related to manoeuvre acceptability.This result was calculated from the prevalence of changes made to a spirometry test session by over-readers (OR) in three asthma clinical trials. The data was analysed to determine the number of test sessions where a manoeuvre was either accepted or rejected by the OR, and highlights the importance of quality control for spirometry data.

Read the full report from Mottram et al.

Vitalograph provides over-reading (data QA) services for all key endpoint data collected by our systems, including spirometry, DLco, respiratory muscle strength assessment, lung volumes and ECG.

Learn about our expertise in this area.

| Vitalograph Clinical Trials |

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Home spirometry DMD
Benefits of home spirometry in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

A recent study by Wasilewska E, et al. (2022) evaluated the effect of home spirometry monitoring on pulmonary function and the strength of respiratory muscles as well as the benefits to DMD patients.

Read More >

 

lung disease

Is there a causal link between kidney function and obstructive lung disease?

Kidney function has previously been associated with obstructive lung disease, however a causal effect has not been demonstrated until now.

Park S, et al. (2021) conducted a bidirectional mendelian randomisation analysis to comprehensively and systematically unravel the association between kidney function and obstructive airway disease. The study supports kidney function impairment as a causative factor for obstructive lung disease.

Read the full report

Vitalograph offers clinical trials solutions including ECG devices and expert cardiac analysis to ensure accurate endpoint data such as QT/QTc, as well as providing timely interpretations and alerts to support safety monitoring of subjects throughout your clinical trial.

| Vitalograph Clinical Trials |

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vitalograph-healthcare-normal-values

Is there a link between heart failure and pulmonary function?

A study by Slepchenko N, et al. (2021) explores whether heart function may change pulmonary function.

The study concludes that a combination of COPD and HF leads to worse clinical presentation of patients and lower pulmonary function according to FEV1 values.

Read the full report.

Vitalograph offers clinical trials solutions including ECG devices and expert cardiac analysis to ensure accurate endpoint data such as QT/QTc, as well as providing timely interpretations and alerts to support safety monitoring of subjects throughout your clinical trial.

| Vitalograph Clinical Trials |

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Tablet with word Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and stethoscope.

What is the feasibility and utility of home monitoring in ILD?

 

The potential role of home monitoring in ILD has been amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic.

A systematic review by Althobiani, MA et al. (2021) evaluated the evidence for the use of home monitoring for early detection of exacerbations and/or progression of ILD. The review reports that home monitoring “is feasible and of potential benefit in patients with ILD”. Studies have also reported that mean adherence to home monitoring was >75%, and where spirometry was performed there was a “significant correlation between home and hospital-based readings”.

The review concludes that while individual studies “provide supportive evidence suggesting the feasibility and utility of home monitoring in ILD, further studies are necessary to quantify the potential of home monitoring to detect disease progression and/or AEs.”

Read the full report.

Vitalograph offers a range of easy-to-use devices suitable for home monitoring.

Vitalograph Home Monitoring for Healthcare |

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3.1.2a Chronic Cough

Recent study shows significant reduction in cough frequency

A recent pooled study by Smith JA et al. (2021) investigated cough frequency in chronic cough patients treated with gefapixant. “In this pooled analysis, gefapixant 45 mg BID demonstrated significant reductions in 24-hour and awake cough frequency vs placebo, with no increase in serious AEs”.

The VitaloJAK™ was used to measure objective cough frequency in this study. Vitalograph’s expert team of cough analysts and the highly consistent performance of the VitaloJAK continue to provide industry-leading objective cough data across different disease areas.

Read the full report by Smith JA et AL.

Learn about our expertise in respiratory clinical studies.

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3.1.2b Influenza Cough

Cough monitoring during COVID-19 pandemic

Muffling caused by the wearing of face masks has been a problem for cough recording systems using free field microphones during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Smith et al. investigated the potential of an algorithm capable of using only the VitaloJAK’s contact sensor data and found that “Single channel processing (contact sensor only) maintained sensitivity, median 100% (99.7-100.0)”. It concludes that the processing of contact sensor data is an acceptable alternative to two-channel recording for the VitaloJAK cough monitoring system.

Vitalograph’s expert team of cough analysts and the highly consistent performance of the VitaloJAK continue to provide industry-leading objective cough data across different disease areas.

Read the full report by Smith et al.

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The effect of body position on Pulmonary Function

We were interested to read the findings of a study from Katz et al. (2018) exploring the influence of body positioning on pulmonary functions tests (PFTs). The results show that body positioning affects the results of PFTs, but the optimal position and significance of the benefit differs between study populations.

Kartz et al. recommend that “the supine position should be considered in addition to sitting for PFTs in patients with SCI and neuromuscular disease. When treating patients with heart, lung, SCI, neuromuscular disease, or obesity, one should take into consideration that pulmonary physiology and function are influenced by body position.”

Read the full report.

Learn about our expertise in respiratory clinical studies.

| Vitalograph Clinical Trials |

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Impact of aquatic exercise on respiratory outcomes in children with neuromuscular disorders

Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) lead to the progressive loss of motor and respiratory functions and a decline in daily activities and participation.

A recent study by Huguet-Rodríguez et al. (2020) aims to assess the respiratory changes and functional outcomes in children attending an aquatic therapy program.  The report states:

“An aquatic exercise program in children with NMD appears to promote short-term increases in certain clinically relevant concepts, such as PCF, inspiratory volume and ventilatory pressures, described as indicators of health status and progression in these pathologies.”

The Vitalograph COPD-6 was used in this study to measure the volume of exhaled air by means of FEV1, FEV6 and the FEV1/FEV6 ratio. 

Learn about our expertise in this area.

#clinicaltrials #respiratory #cough #clinicalresearch #NMD

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How viable is home spirometry as a clinical endpoint in fibrotic ILD?

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in new challenges in lung clinical trials, such as patients being unable to access hospital spirometry.  

A recent study reported by Khan et al. investigated the potential of using home spirometry as a clinical endpoint in fibrotic ILD. The study concluded that “Home spirometry in fibrotic ILD is feasible and non-inferior to hospital spirometry.” Read the full report by Khan et al.  

Learn how Vitalograph’s custom solutions and personalised approach meet a wide range of respiratory clinical study needs, including home spirometry.

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The effects of respiratory training in Parkinson’s Disease

Relatively little is known about respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and there is uncertainty about the rate of progression through the disease and optimal management approach. A study by van de Wetering-van Dongen et al. (2020) evaluated whether respiratory training improved muscle strength, lung function, thoracic mobility, functional capacity, and cardiac autonomic function in PD.

The study found that respiratory training shows positive effects and should be considered for patients who have a prior history of respiratory dysfunction. Read the full report by van de Wetering-van Dongen et al.

 

Learn how Vitalograph’s custom solutions and personalised approach meet a wide range of respiratory clinical study needs, including home spirometry.

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View our extensive reference library.

Respiratory Insights

Learn more about respiratory issues and get insights and advice from experts around the world. 

GINA 2022 – What you need to know about Asthma Inhaler Adherence

We outline the main points from the 2022 GINA report which offers guidance on asthma control and asthma severity, key points in overall asthma management.  Read More >

 
Child with asthma inhaler

Differentiating Asthma from COPD

Whilst asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different diseases they cause similar symptoms, which can present a challenge in identifying which disease a patient is suffering from.  Learn here what the important distinctions are and how to distinguish COPD from Asthma. Read More >

 
Significant reductions in cough frequency

Information for patients: COPD and the benefits of proper inhaler use

The Respiratory Health Association’s information paper for patients, written by Hannah Mestyanek. 

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a group of chronic lung diseases, including emphysema and bronchitis, that block airflow in the lungs. Damaged lungs and mucus buildup make it hard for the lungs to spread oxygen to the rest of the body, which makes breathing difficult for people living with COPD. 

While there is no cure for COPD, it can be managed. One management strategy is controlling symptoms through medications. Inhalers and inhalation therapies are the primary medication treatment mode for COPD. Medications help treat symptoms, control complications, reduce exacerbations, and increase the time between exacerbations. However, these benefits can only be reached when the inhaler device is used properly.

Incorrect inhaler use can occur in nearly 50% of cases and can be attributed to several factors:
• Patient characteristics (cognitive condition, self-efficacy, co-morbidities)
• Social factors (provider-patient relationship, access, support, training, follow-up)
• Medication treatment (device, methods, dosing, side effects)

These factors, combined or by themselves, can lead to critical errors of inhaler use. Common errors include:
• Not inhaling through the device
• Blowing on a device that has a powder ready to be inhaled
• Insufficient inhalation duration or force
• Not holding the device correctly

When a patient misuses his or her inhaler, medication can’t be delivered properly and minimizes the benefits. When a medication is not used to achieve full benefits, patients may feel that it’s not working and stop using it. This non-adherence can then lead to exacerbations, worsening symptoms, and even hospitalizations.
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There are several strategies that can help improve and achieve correct inhaler use. It’s important to speak with your healthcare provider about how to correctly use the prescribed inhaler. At your next medical appointment, be sure to bring the inhaler and show your provider how you use it. This allows your provider to correct any mistakes and gives you the opportunity to ask any questions. There are many types of inhaler devices, so be honest about your lifestyle when speaking with you provider. They’ll be able to prescribe a device that suits your needs and lifestyle. It may be a good idea to create and maintain a routine to ensure you stick to your dosing schedule. While inhalers may not fit in regular pillboxes, they can be stored next to them or in view of other medications.

It’s important to continue using your prescribed medications even if you start feeling better. Always consult your provider before stopping any medication use.

Medications are essential to managing a COPD diagnosis. Correct inhaler techniques, honest conversations with healthcare professionals, and adhering to medication routines can help you live better with COPD.

Written by Hannah Mestyanek, MHA

Respiratory Health Association

| Download the paper |

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4300_MY_PEF_04

Information for Patients: How to use a Peak Flow Meter

Peak Flow Meters are a user-friendly and accurate way to monitor Asthma.  Close monitoring of peak flow helps protect quality of life and optimize the efficacy of medication. Learn how to use your Peak Flow Meter correctly. Watch Video

 

Aim Vital Insights Article

The challenge of correct inhaler use

In the 1980s Vitalograph understood the challenge of correct inhaler use and developed the first Aerosol Inhalation Monitor (AIM™) which allowed objective assessment of inhaler use for the first time outside the laboratory.

Read more >

Back view of large group of business people having a training class in a board room.

Minimising the spread of viruses – including Corona virus – during PFT

University of Limerick’s Professor Colum Dunne and colleagues tested Vitalograph BVFs to assess their effectiveness in preventing bacterial or viral transfer to and from respiratory equipment.

The results speak for themselves. The electrostatically charged barrier in the BVFs filters droplets, aerosols, bacteria and viruses – including viruses the same size as Corona virus – out of the airstream. 

Results showed >99.999% effectiveness for prevention of microbial transfer to equipment. BVFs also reduced potential transfer from equipment to user to a level below levels of detection.

We have no hesitation in recommending that you use a BVF every time for maximum possible protection.  When a new BVF is used for every patient the interior of the device is protected so only exterior surface should require cleaning.

| Vitalograph BVFs |

| Prof. Dunne’s Report |

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View our white papers on respiratory topics.

At Vitalograph

Learn more about life at Vitalograph, who we are and what we do.

A Fundraising Summer’s Walk in Buckingham for Asthma + Lung UK

To celebrate 21 years of empowering respiratory research through our clinical trials service, a large group of walkers from our UK office participated in a fun team fundraising walk around 21 landmarks in Buckingham, all with the aim of raising awareness and funds for Asthma + Lung UK. 

Read the full story here 

Buckingham Landmarks Fundraising Vitalograph
buckinghamrugbyandvitalograph

Buckingham Rugby Club ‘moves the goalposts’ with help from Vitalograph

To accomodate the recent swell in membership at Buckingham Rubgy Club, Vitalograph is supporting the club by donating towards the costs of creating the new training pitch. These additional sports grounds will ensure Buckingham Rugby can run the multiple training sessions required to facilitate the growing and diverse club membership. 

Read the full story here

 

Spirometry in Occupational Health

“Previously, at the end of a spirometry test you just needed an expiration but now the ATS/ERS 2019 guidelines recommend inspiration with maximum effort to end a test.”

Lots of really useful advice from Vitalograph’s Charlene Mhangami at  the Health and Wellbeing at Work Expo in the NEC in Birminham recently. If you missed it, register for one of Charlene’s monthly webinars that have a specific Occupational Health focus.

#OccupationalHealth

 

International Women’s Day: Meet Sandria

To celebrate #IWD2022 we are shining a spotlight on Women in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech. Meet Sandria Silva, an Electronics Engineer in the Vitalograph R&D Department.

#breakthebias

Sandria works in the Vitalograph R&D Department in Ennis. Her job includes assisting in the designing and development of new products.

What is your favourite part of your job?

Being able to learn new things every day. Another great thing is working in a team. If I ever get stuck, there is always someone around to talk it through with me and help me.

What challenges do you face in your job?

Having a lot of patience is really important in my job. Sometimes, some tests will not give the expected results and I may have to sit with it and analyse it for hours to understand the issue.

What influenced you to choose a career in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech?

Working in the Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech industry makes me feel like I’m a part of something big, something meaningful, and something that has a positive impact on people’s life.

Why should more women choose to work in the MedTech Sector?

Honestly, the future looks bright. It is a great place to work for women and men equally and it would be interesting to see more diversity in the industry. Women need to be more present in MedTech because we have different perspectives to offer. One great thing about human beings is that we all are different. A women’s perspective could shed a completely different light on any topic being brought to a table of men. More than everything it is an amazing opportunity for your work life to enable your life’s work.

What advice would you give to any women planning a career in MedTech?

Finding the proper programs that will allow you to bolster your skills is very important. It is not always important to have a science background when planning a career in MedTech. There are varied opportunities in the business and commercial side, which are in great demand.

| Read the full article |

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International Women’s Day: Meet Sondra

To celebrate #IWD2022 we are shining a spotlight on Women in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech. Meet Sondra Agee-McCully, Service and Support Manager at Vitalograph USA.

#breakthebias

Sondra is responsible for overseeing the service of Vitalograph equipment for healthcare and clinical trials, and for providing support to end-users.

What is your favourite part of your job?

Everything!! It is difficult to pick just one thing. If I had to, it’s the people and customers I work with. I really enjoy the feeling of supporting them as much as I can. I love to learn new things and in this business things are constantly changing, with new products being continually developed. 

What challenges do you face in your job?

Sometimes there are just not enough hours in the day. When I arrive in the early am and begin my work, and then I wonder why all of a sudden I’m so hungry, only to find out that it’s time for lunch. I always look at challenges as a way to grow and learn.

What influenced you to choose a career in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech?

My mother was an amazing caregiver and so full of passion for other people when they were in need. She taught me how to care for and support people in an amazing way. My father was a machinist for the railroad so growing up he taught me how things worked and functioned. It was a great skill to have. I often would take things apart only to put them back together again and again. I am a combination of both of my parents and will always and forever be grateful to them.

Why should more women choose to work in the MedTech sector?

Opportunity. There are so many avenues in this sector and it is constantly evolving. I love that I am not doing the same thing day-in and day-out. 

What advice would you give to any woman planning a career in MedTech?

Research your natural love of things and build from there. As they say, if you love your job, then you never work a day in your life! Be flexible and support change as an avenue for growth. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and find people in the field you are interested in and see what their day is like.

| Read the full article |

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International Women’s Day: Meet Jennifer

To celebrate #IWD2022 we are shining a spotlight on Women in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech. Meet Jennifer Donohue, a Project Coordinator specialising in cough studies at Vitalograph. 

#breakthebias

Jennifer works on cough studies, a very unique and specialized area of work that supports research into new and existing cough medication for conditions such as chronic cough, IPF, and COPD.

What is your favourite part of your job?

My favourite part of the job is knowing the genuine difference that my work plays in someone’s life. We have seen videos and testimonials of people with conditions such as chronic cough and knowing that my work is helping to find a solution for them is huge. We don’t always remember how important everyone’s role is in the creation of a greater good. And that’s what our sector is all about – creating tangible solutions in everyday health.

What challenges do you face in your job?

It’s a very busy and diverse role. You definitely need a head for reporting and numbers, but your interpersonal skills are also important because we work with people around the world, and communication via email and in-person is important.

What influenced you to choose a career in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech?

I did a Marketing and Management degree and having gained some experience in marketing, I joined to strengthen my management skills. I’ve been with the company for over 6 years and it’s been a continued growth opportunity for me.

Why should more women choose to work in the MedTech sector?

There is a huge range of opportunities in the MedTech sector across a range of specialties – it’s not just about people skilled in engineering and clinical settings, for example, I come from a communications background and have built a solid career in the field. There’s a lot of job security as well – the sector is not going away anytime soon and Ireland has established itself as a strategic location for a large number of companies in the MedTech field so there are plenty of opportunities.

What advice would you give to any woman planning a career in MedTech?

Don’t be afraid to get an entry-level role because most companies are very willing to promote from within and provide people with career progression. Even if you have a ‘softer’ skillset (rather than science and maths), there are still ample opportunities because MedTech companies require marketing, human resources, etc.

| Read the full article |

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International Women’s Day: Meet Liz

To celebrate #IWD2022 we are shining a spotlight on Women in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech. Meet Dr Liz Watson, a Clinical Solutions Architect on our Clinical Trials team. 

#breakthebias

Liz is based in our Buckingham office in the UK. Her relationship with new and existing sponsors is extremely important and is key to Vitalograph’s clinical trials offerings for both our customers and internal study teams.

 What is your favourite part of your job?

My favorite part of the job is the versatility to perform a variety of tasks within my role, and the variability from day to day so that the days are never dull. I enjoy liaising directly with Sponsors to develop new solutions and innovations or help streamline a routine task.

 What challenges do you face in your job?

The biggest challenge is time and managing expectations. Often a request may start simple, but develop into a bit of a beast, and it is important to remember what the reason for the development is and ensure that the simplest and most effective solution is put in place so that risks are reduced and the users have the best possible experience.

 What influenced you to choose a career in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech?

I have always loved science and working in Respiratory Diagnostics MedTech allows this knowledge to be applied, and although you are not directly patient-facing you are contributing to the development of products and services that support studies that can potentially have a positive impact on the treatment and management of respiratory diseases.

 Why should more women choose to work in the MedTech sector?

I think women have a well-founded role in MedTech not just through technical skills but also because of their softer skills of empathy, emotional intelligence, and open communication that can build good customer relationships and a better understanding of the sponsor and product users’ needs.

 What advice would you give to any woman planning a career in MedTech?

The majority of MedTech roles involve problem-solving, so it is best to think holistically, keep communication channels open and work as a team. Ultimately you should always aim to enjoy what you do, and always try to do everything to the best of your abilities.

| Read the full article |

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Exhale Podcast

Listen in as Mark Russell and Janson Lanier discuss topical issues in spirometry and respiratory care people from all walks of life and at all levels, including those on the frontlines, academic experts, and pioneers with big plans for the future of healthcare and occupational health. Every experience makes for interesting listening. 
dermot ryan

We had an opportunity to speak with Dr Dermot Ryan, Honorary Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh and was the Chairman of the Primary Care Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. We discuss Primary Care physicians in the United Kingdom and how they deal with Asthma. Listen here

 

Both Janson and Mark, interviewed Dr. Jane Frances Namatovu a regarded primary care physician and lecturer at the Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences Makerere University Kampala.

We discuss the topic Chronic Cough from her home country Uganda Africa. Listen here

Mark and Janson talk to digital expert Luke Marshall, founder and CEO of VitalFlo, who remote monitoring for lung health.  VitalFlo is on a mission to dramatically improve the experience of those living with chronic respiratory disease by revolutionising clinical research and the way care is delivered. Listen here

We talk with Carol Stonham, MBE, Executive Chair of the Primary Care Respiratory Society UK. The first non-doctor and first female to take the chair. Carol is a director of the UK Lung Cancer Coalition, a board member of the UK Inhaler Group and National Asthma and COPD Audit, as well as sitting on the NHS Long Term Plan Respiratory Delivery Board. Listen here

This year marks the 21st anniversary for Vitalograph’s Clinical Trial Services. Mark and Janson interviewed Lewis Weidman, former Director of Vitalograph Ltd, where he had worked since 1991. He has responsibility for Vitalograph’s global business within the pharmaceutical industry and in particular within the field of respiratory clinical trials. Listen here

Mark and Janson speak with Joel Africk, President and CEO of Respiratory Health Association. We discuss about RHA about their new Digital COPD Caregiver’s Toolkit. Listen here

Since May is Asthma and Allergy Awareness month, Mark and Janson interviewed Dr. Garen Wolff of Wolff Allergy & Asthma in Detroit MI. She is qualified to treat both adults and the pediatric population for diseases that involve allergies, asthma and the immune system. Listen here

Mark and Janson interview David Weill, author of “Exhale. Hope, Healing and a Life in Transplant” and is the former Director of the Center for Advanced Lung Disease and the Lung Transplant Program at Stanford university. David is currently the principal of Weill Consulting Group, which focuses on improving the delivery of transplant care.   Listen here

We talk with Lori Wilken, Clinical Pharmacist at University of Illinois at Chicago. Lori is an advocate with over twenty years experience in patient care and a strong background in outpatient pulmonary medicine. Lori has extensive clinical experience with tobacco dependence, asthma, and COPD.   Listen here

Carl Mottram

Mark and Janson talk to Carl Mottram, author of the new 12th edition Ruppel’s Manual of Pulmonary Function and testing. Carl is a recognized expert in the field of pulmonary diagnostics and his book is considered the definitive textbook in the field.

Listen here

MarcLRubin-1

We talk with Marc L. Rubin, Respiratory Care Pharmacist and consultant for the Texas Asthma Control Collaborative. Marc has extensive experience in asthma and immunology and has a lot to say about inhaler techniques. We discuss the issues, cost and impact of inhaler use and training.

Listen here

stephanie-linkedin

Stephanie Lynch PhD, Product Manager at OHD, has a passion for  occupational health and safety. Her focus includes Research, Industrial Hygiene, #OccupationalHealth, and Environmental Awareness. Stephanie chats to Mark and Janson about how COVID 19 has impacted the workplace and how employers and employees can safeguard from future pandemics.

Listen here

View our full list of podcast guests and topics.

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